Federal Government announces $16 million fruit fly package

Fruit Fly Nov. 21, 2018

Minister for agriculture David Littleproud said a $16.9-million-dollar package would assure trading partners when produce came from a fruit-fly free area.

“Fruit fly outbreaks cost the horticultural industry millions every year,” said Littleproud.

“If we take control of fruit fly we’ll get access to more premium markets and boost farm gate prices.

“We’ve started a trial of smart-traps that’ll send farmers instant alerts if fruit fly is detected,” he said.

Sensors detect fruit flies in the trap by the way they move and send mobile alerts to growers.

“This can provide farmers the best possible information so they can respond to an outbreak quicker.

“We’re also investing in a national mapping program, to track the movement of QFly in summer,” said Littleproud.

“The flies make their way south as it warms up and this will let growers know where they are and help us target where to release our sterile fruit flies.

“We’re putting extension officers on the ground to help growers use the latest science,” he said.

The officers help farmers work through the latest research and development that they can then put to work in their orchards.

“This package will help protect our $12 billion horticultural industry and reassure our trading partners of the systems we have in place,” said Littleproud.

Australia’s horticultural production employs more than 50,000 people.

The program will go the management of fruit flies such as the Mediterranean fruit fly in areas including in Western Australia and the Northern Territory, and the native Queensland fruit fly on the East Coast.

For the year ending June 2017, Australia exported $2.23 billion worth of horticultural products.

The program will go the management of fruit flies such as the Mediterranean fruit fly in areas including in Western Australia and the Northern Territory, and the native Queensland fruit fly on the East Coast.

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